How to Prepare for the Coming Age of Dynamic Infrastructure

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Whether you’re a small business considering cloud services or an enterprise contemplating public or private cloud services, it pays to understand some of the technical challenges and players likely to have a significant impact on the availability, security and costs of those services. Cloud computing is a game changer, and it may also pay to know who could win or lose as IT services are decoupled from specialized hardware in specific locations. Don’t let the endless list of companies proclaiming cloud leadership confuse you that the world has already embraced cloud; there is a vast difference between using cloud services to deliver software as a service and delivering cloud IT services in a multi-tenant public environment. There is also a sizable gap between cloud announcements, cloud revenue and enterprise-ready cloud services. Vendors who best address the gap b... (more)

Are Enterprises Ready for Cloud Computing?

Barry Lynn's Blog There have been multiple white papers and articles written by analysts - Is Cloud Computing Ready for the Enterprise? The question is asked so many times now - Is Cloud Computing ready for the enterprise? So, I have to ask - Is the enterprise ready for Cloud Computing? I’ll start this discourse with a few PC and sincere comments (the two are not mutually exclusive unless one is running for political office). First, I love Corporate CIOs and IT managers (not in a romantic way, of course, but with great admiration). Second, they have the most difficult jobs in the corporate universe. They are the brains and the central nervous systems of large enterprises. They are also the most taken for granted of all executives. They represent cost centers who get no credit for their corporations’ profits, while keeping the corporation alive. If they achieve 99.99%... (more)

Interview with Marten Mickos

Marten Mickos is now the head of the Database Group at Sun Microsystems I have asked Marten a few questions related to the new strategy of MySQL, now part of Sun Microsystems. See his reply below. RVZ Q1. It appears as if the positioning of MySQL has been refocused more predominately on the Web applications / SaaS / ASP market in the last year or so. Would you agree with this, and if so, what does that mean regarding the potential of MySQL to penetrate further into the enterprise? Marten Mickos: Great question. We believe that enterprises will move to web-based architectures, and with that wave, MySQL is penetrating the enterprise market. Goldman Sachs stated in 2006 that "the shift to more web-based applications in the enterprise is unstoppable". The percentage is still relatively low (10-20% I think) but it is growing. Q2. Lack of enterprise-grade support and vendor ser... (more)

Cloud Computing: 3Tera goes for Global Delivery Model, makes AppLogic ready on all continents!

(Office 2.0 Conference, San Francisco, CA —September 4, 2008)— 3Tera, Inc., the leading innovator of cloud computing technology and utility computing, announces the availability of global cloud services, based on 3Tera's AppLogic grid operating system. Driven by demand from multi-national customers and customers outside the United States, 3Tera has selected partners to offer cloud solutions on four continents and provide redundant online resources worldwide. 3Tera currently has partners and is running in datacenters in seven countries (United States, Japan, Singapore, Argentina, United Kingdom, Netherlands and Serbia) on four continents (North America, South American, Asia, and Europe), with additional resources in South America and Australia soon to be available as well. The global offering allows customers to choose their location and expand or move to different r... (more)

Load balancing is key to successful cloud-based (dynamic) architectures

Much of the dialogue today surrounding cloud computing and virtualization is still taking the 50,000 foot view. It's all conceptual; it's all about business value, justification, interoperability, and use cases. These are all good conversations that need to happen in order for cloud computing and virtualization-based architectures to mature, but as is often the case that leaves the folks tasked with building something right now a bit on their own. So let's ignore the high-level view for just a bit and talk reality. Many folks are being tasked, now, with designing or even implementing some form of a cloud computing architecture - usually based around virtualization technology like VMWare (a March 2008 Gartner Research report predicted VMWare would likely hold 85% of the virtualization market by the end of 2008). But architecting a cloud-based environment requires more ... (more)

The Great Client-Server Architecture Myth

The webification of applications over the years has led to the belief that client-server as an architecture is dying. But very few beliefs about architecture have been further from the truth. The belief that client-server was dying - or at least falling out of favor -  was primarily due to fact that early browser technology was used only as a presentation mechanism. The browser did not execute application logic, did not participate in application logic, and acted more or less like a television: smart enough to know how to display data but not smart enough to do anything about it. But the sudden explosion of Web 2.0 style applications and REST APIs have changed all that and client-server is very much in style again, albeit with a twist. Developers no longer need to write the core of a so-called "fat client" from the ground up. The browser or a framework such as Adobe... (more)

Interoperability between clouds requires more than just VM portability

The issue of application state and connection management is one often discussed in the context of cloud computing and virtualized architectures. That's because the stress placed on existing static infrastructure due to the potentially rapid rate of change associated with dynamic application provisioning is enormous and, as is often pointed out, existing "infrastructure 1.0" systems are generally incapable of reacting in a timely fashion to such changes occurring in real-time. The most basic of concerns continues to revolve around IP address management. This is a favorite topic of Greg Ness at Infrastructure 2.0 and has been subsequently addressed in a variety of articles and blogs since the concepts of cloud computing and virtualization have gained momentum. The Burton Group has addressed this issue with regards to interoperability in a recent post, positing that p... (more)

The days of IP-based management are numbered

The focus of cloud and virtualization discussions today revolve primarily around hypervisors, virtual machines, automation, network and application network infrastructure; on the dynamic infrastructure necessary to enable a truly dynamic data center. In all the hype we’ve lost sight of the impact these changes will have on other critical IT systems such as network systems management (NSM) and application performance management (APM). You know their names: IBM, CA, Compuware, BMC, HP. There are likely one or more of their systems monitoring and managing applications and systems in your data center right now. They provide alerts, notifications, and the reports IT managers demand on a monthly or weekly basis to prove IT is meeting the service-level agreements around performance and availability made with business stakeholders. In a truly dynamic data center, one in wh... (more)

The Three Horsemen of the Coming Network Revolution

I came back Friday AM fresh from the FIRE conference Meeting of the Minds planning session in Seattle with a head filled with ideas about where the IT industry is headed and what it will mean for the networking industry.  Thanks to an animated and robust dinner discussion, which included Mark Anderson, Ty Carlson and Michael Pfeffer, I came to the conclusion that three forces will be combining in the near future to drive a revolution in the network industry. Before I get to the three forces let me digress a bit and talk about the simmering preconditions for takeoff.  For Infrastructure 2.0 blog and Archimedius readers, these themes aren't new; yet they need to be rolled up to put the "Horsemen" in proper context. Preconditions for the Revolution The Peak IT meme is describes a collision between the ongoing expansion of IT infrastructure and rising per-unit managemen... (more)

Please fasten your seatbelts, there’s turbulence in that there cloud

There is no evidence, no research, no surveys that indicate the cloud is, or ever will be, ready to completely outsource an organization’s data center. There’s no reason to even believe that’s the goal of cloud providers, though it might seem a logical conclusion. So making outrageous claims about the capabilities of the cloud, and the relevance of the data center, does no one any good. What’s got me so riled up? This particular statement from a prediction for 2009 from Appirio: But all this talk about “private clouds” is a distraction from the real news: the vast majority of companies shouldn’t need to worry about operating any sort of data center anymore, cloud-like or not. coupled with this statement: There’s also something very suspicious in all this discussion of private clouds…. private clouds are advocated mainly by companies who make their money from selli... (more)

Nick Carr's Cloud-Network Disconnect

Virtualization and cloud computing are promising to change the way in which IT services are delivered and, in effect, transform computing as we know it today.  I think the promises are likely to come true, if and only if critical technology issues are addressed. Nicholas Carr told a recent audience at IDC Directions that "Cloud computing has become the center of investment and innovation."   While he is not a technologist, his sometimes shocking insight into the transformation of IT have been prescient, even if he doesn't sweat the details of how complex IT infrastructures can morph into the equivalent of today's public utilities. To his credit Carr has predicted the rise of the cloud computing press release, multiple cloud conferences and panels and even the SaaS repositioning exercise.  He also foresaw the rise in Amazon and Google cloud announcements, perhaps year... (more)